Comics By Ink

Musings and doodlings of writer/cartoonist Max Ink
This year has really been a comic book geek movie goer’s dream come true. I think it’s because so many of the people who are making the decisions on how these flicks get made are geeks, dorks and dweebs in their hearts.
Don’t pay any attention to Sam, whenever I talk with her about anything geeky, she gets all fuddy-duddy. But I love her anyways. 
Oh, and ain’t Blink just so randy? Drawing Rocket & Groot while listening to Moonage Daydream? She’s the bestest.

This year has really been a comic book geek movie goer’s dream come true. I think it’s because so many of the people who are making the decisions on how these flicks get made are geeks, dorks and dweebs in their hearts.

Don’t pay any attention to Sam, whenever I talk with her about anything geeky, she gets all fuddy-duddy. But I love her anyways. 

Oh, and ain’t Blink just so randy? Drawing Rocket & Groot while listening to Moonage Daydream? She’s the bestest.

Comics! Comics! Get’cher comics here! (Stand-up comics, that is.)
Growing up in the 70s and 80s, my fave comedians were Steve Martin, Bill Cosby, Steven Wright, Richard Pryor and eventually George Carlin. During that time, I was unaware of Bill Hicks, “the comedian’s comedian.” Bill and George had similar philosophies about life and comedy, but George was more well known. (That’s why I had Sam give George the shout-out.) 
I actually found out about Bill Hicks from a comic strip, Zen Pencils, a webcomic that adapts inspirational quotes from famous people. This is the routine that the comic strip quotes from:

You watch the entire show here. 
As for the local comedy scene in Columbus, it’s pleasantly impressive. I even managed to partake (as an audience member) in a comedy album by Chris Paugh, so that’s nice.

Comics! Comics! Get’cher comics here! (Stand-up comics, that is.)

Growing up in the 70s and 80s, my fave comedians were Steve Martin, Bill Cosby, Steven Wright, Richard Pryor and eventually George Carlin. During that time, I was unaware of Bill Hicks, “the comedian’s comedian.” Bill and George had similar philosophies about life and comedy, but George was more well known. (That’s why I had Sam give George the shout-out.) 

I actually found out about Bill Hicks from a comic strip, Zen Pencils, a webcomic that adapts inspirational quotes from famous people. This is the routine that the comic strip quotes from:

You watch the entire show here

As for the local comedy scene in Columbus, it’s pleasantly impressive. I even managed to partake (as an audience member) in a comedy album by Chris Paugh, so that’s nice.

Jus’ a lil’ relaxin’ sketch. :)

Jus’ a lil’ relaxin’ sketch. :)

Ambition, craving, greed, yearning… wanting what you do not have. In my mid-20s, when I was studying Eastern philosophy, I thought that desire led to suffering. And it can. 
But in the twenty years since, I’ve decided that trying to live without ambition isn’t the life for me. I’ve also learned that “the trick” to not suffering is to acknowledge what you want without allowing it to turn into what you expect. Expectations unmet lead to disappointment and resentment. And that sucks.  
I want to make comics; so I’m making comics. I’m getting what I want and I’m happy. I also want (more) people to read my comics; but I can’t expect (more) people to read my comics. That road leads to suckiness. And a life less sucky is a life worth living.

Ambition, craving, greed, yearning… wanting what you do not have. In my mid-20s, when I was studying Eastern philosophy, I thought that desire led to suffering. And it can

But in the twenty years since, I’ve decided that trying to live without ambition isn’t the life for me. I’ve also learned that “the trick” to not suffering is to acknowledge what you want without allowing it to turn into what you expect. Expectations unmet lead to disappointment and resentment. And that sucks.  

I want to make comics; so I’m making comics. I’m getting what I want and I’m happy. I also want (more) people to read my comics; but I can’t expect (more) people to read my comics. That road leads to suckiness. And a life less sucky is a life worth living.

“Don’t Wait.”
Matt Slaybaugh is a theatre geek, a comics nerd and the creative director of Available Light Theatre.  He’s also an inspiring public speaker. (And he wrote the introduction to my first Blink graphic novel, So Far. Which is fair, since I’ve done a couple of things for him.) 
I’ve known Matt for just over a decade and he’s been teaching me ever since. Either through what he says to me directly, or what he does himself creatively; I’m always learning from Matt. 

Don’t Wait.”

Matt Slaybaugh is a theatre geek, a comics nerd and the creative director of Available Light Theatre.  He’s also an inspiring public speaker. (And he wrote the introduction to my first Blink graphic novel, So Far. Which is fair, since I’ve done a couple of things for him.) 

I’ve known Matt for just over a decade and he’s been teaching me ever since. Either through what he says to me directly, or what he does himself creatively; I’m always learning from Matt.